Keio Business School

Established in 1858 by Yukichi Fukuzawa as a small school of Western learning, Keio has a history as Japan’s very first private institution of higher learning. Over 150 years since its founding, Keio has thrived under its founder’s motto of jitsugaku, or empirical science, as it continues to transform Japan as a modern nation through contributions to education, research, and medicine.

Jitsugaku ( 実学 )

Jitsugaku is a way of learning about the world pursued by Keio University’s founder Yukichi Fukuzawa through the application of reason, observation, and verification, and it stemmed from his desire to break free of the Confucian ideals that informed scholarship in 19th-century Japan. Jitsugaku is science in the truest sense of the word and a powerful tool in Keio University’s never-ending search for practical solutions to real-life problems.

Keio Business School

Keio ranks second in Japan, for the number of alumni holding CEO positions in Fortune Global 500 companies, according to Mines ParisTech: Professional Ranking of World Universities. Keio is also ranked 1st in Japan for the number of alumni generally holding executive positions (when positions like COO, CFO, CIO etc. are included along with the CEO position) in listed companies of Japan, and this number per student (probability of becoming an executive) is also top.

Keio Business School is Japan’s first business school and one of only two Japanese schools holding The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accreditation. Keio was ranked No. 1 in Japan by Nikkei Shimbun. Eduniversal also ranked Keio as top in Japan (75th in the world). In Eduniversal Keio is one of only 3 Japanese schools categorized in „Universal Business schools with major international influence“. In 2012, the Keio Business School became founding member of the university alliance Council on Business & Society that consists of Tuck School of Business from USA, University of Mannheim Business School from Germany, ESSEC Business School from France, Fudan University from China, Fundação Getúlio Vargas from Brazil and Keio Business School.

According to the Weekly Economist’s 2010 rankings and the PRESIDENT’s article on 16 October 2006, graduates from Keio University have the 3rd best employment rate in 400 major companies, and the alumni’s average salary is the 3rd best in Japan.